George W Citroner

Copy Editor, Copywriter, Technical Writer, Writer

Copywriter & Journalist

I write breaking news, features, and provide copywriting services for major brands, including Medscape, T-Mobile, Amway, Livestrong, and Healthline.
Categories
Content Types
Article, Blog Post, Interview, Whitepaper
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CUNY Hunter College, BSc
NY|English
Publications

Medical Journalism

52
Forget the Bathroom... This Is the Place at the Airport with the Most Germs
healthline.comArticle
Forget the Bathroom... This Is the Place at the Airport with the Most Germs

The researchers found that while at least one respiratory virus was present on 10 percent of everything swabbed, the microbes that could make you sick were particularly common on items such as plastic security bins, card readers in shops, passport checking counters, staircase rails, and children’s play areas.

September, 12 2018
Childhood 'Bridge Symptoms' May Predict Adult Depression
medscape.comArticle
Childhood 'Bridge Symptoms' May Predict Adult Depression

For the first time, researchers have identified "bridge symptoms" in childhood that could be central indicators of anxiety or depressive disorders in later life. In the population-based study, investigators examined the network structure of emotional and behavioral symptoms among elementary school-aged girls in Quebec, Canada. They discovered that bridge symptoms, such as irritability and rejection, were associated with the development of anxiety disorders or major depression in early adulthood.

August, 15 2018
Too Much ‘Good’ Cholesterol Can Cause Health Problems
healthline.comArticle
Too Much ‘Good’ Cholesterol Can Cause Health Problems

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in Georgia studied almost 6,000 people to discover the effect of cholesterol levels on the risk of heart attack and death.

September, 5 2018
Can a Baby Poop ‘Cocktail’ Really Improve Your Gut Health?
healthline.comArticle
Can a Baby Poop ‘Cocktail’ Really Improve Your Gut Health?

Researchers say a probiotic cocktail made from infant feces shows promise in increasing production of short-chain fatty acids in the digestive system.

August, 29 2018
IBD Symptoms May Be Eased by Substance Found in Marijuana
healthline.comArticle
IBD Symptoms May Be Eased by Substance Found in Marijuana

Researchers say a compound in cannabis may in essence “turn off” inflammation in the gut and help with inflammatory bowel disease. There may be a substance in marijuana that can “turn off” gut inflammation. And, if true, that could offer relief for millions of people experiencing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Bath in England performed experiments on mice and human cells. They said they discovered that chemicals in cannabis, called cannabinoids, mimic a compound our bodies naturally produce to regulate gut inflammation. This process, they said, could be used to create more effective treatments for IBD, a chronic and painful illness.

August, 21 2018
New AI Platform Diagnoses Brain Disease in Seconds
medscape.comArticle
New AI Platform Diagnoses Brain Disease in Seconds

An artificial intelligence (AI) platform accurately identifies acute neurologic events, such as stroke, from CT scans in as little as 1.2 seconds, new research suggests. If the findings are confirmed, this technology would radically speed the triage process by immediately alerting physicians to critical findings that may otherwise have remained in a queue from minutes to hours.

August, 13 2018
Inducing Labor at 39 Weeks Might Be Safer Than a C-Section… Here’s Why
healthline.comArticle
Inducing Labor at 39 Weeks Might Be Safer Than a C-Section… Here’s Why

According to a new study, inducing labor at 39 weeks can significantly reduce the chances of a woman needing a cesarean (C-section) birth. The research from Northwestern University was published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). The study authors said that inducing labor at 39 weeks for first-time mothers can significantly reduce the odds of undergoing this invasive surgery.

August, 13 2018
Kidney Dialysis Can Raise Risk of Dementia in Older Adults
healthline.comArticle
Kidney Dialysis Can Raise Risk of Dementia in Older Adults

I spoke with Mara McAdams DeMarco, PhD, lead study author and assistant professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University about her new study for Healthline.

August, 9 2018
Children Exposed to Drugs, Violence Experience Higher Incidence of HIV as Adults
mdmag.comArticle
Children Exposed to Drugs, Violence Experience Higher Incidence of HIV as Adults

Evidence suggests that exposure to certain types of mental and physical stress in adolescence may make it more likely that as adults they will practice behaviors that increase the risk of HIV infection. A longitudinal study conducted by the over 18 years, from Sept. 1994–May 2013, studied the effects exposure to illicit drug use, and violence had on adolescents in later adulthood.

January, 3 2018
Future of FMT May Depend on New AGA Registry
mdmag.comArticle
Future of FMT May Depend on New AGA Registry

The first participant has been enrolled in the American Gastroenterological Association’s (AGA) fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) study, planned to be the largest of its kind.

January, 18 2018
Possible Obstacle to HIV 'Kick and Kill' Method Found
mdmag.comArticle
Possible Obstacle to HIV 'Kick and Kill' Method Found

A new study conducted by George Washington University researchers found that latent HIV reservoirs are resistant to CD8+ T-cells, the white blood cells which eliminate infected cells. Current anti-HIV treatments are very effective at making HIV undetectable, allowing people living with the virus to live longer and healthier lives. These treatments use a class of medications to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART), which also dramatically reduces the possibility of person to person transmission.

January, 26 2018
Why Millennials Are Losing Their Hair Earlier
healthline.comArticle
Why Millennials Are Losing Their Hair Earlier

Stress, diet, and even hair treatments are among the possible reasons younger generations are noticing hair loss at an earlier age. Have you noticed that younger people seem to be losing their hair a lot sooner? It may not be your imagination. New research found that people in China in their 20s are going bald sooner than any generation before them.

January, 21 2018
The Discrimination LGBTQ People Still Face from Healthcare Providers
healthline.comArticle
The Discrimination LGBTQ People Still Face from Healthcare Providers

People with certain sexual orientations say healthcare providers can be reluctant to treat them, and health insurers discriminate against them in their policies. When it comes to accessing quality healthcare in the United States, people in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community may still be experiencing discrimination due to their sexual identity or HIV status.

February, 21 2018
Anticholinergic Practice May Not Affect Tardive Dyskinesia
mdmag.comArticle
Anticholinergic Practice May Not Affect Tardive Dyskinesia

A systematic analysis of 712 references from the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials investigated the use or withdrawal of anticholinergic drugs in patients experiencing antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD). Guy Schwartz, MD, neurologist, assistant professor and director of the Movement Disorders Section in the Department of Neurology at Stony Brook Medicine, explained the significance of these findings to MD Magazine.

February, 16 2018
How Can Baby Boomers Become More HCV Aware?
mdmag.comArticle
How Can Baby Boomers Become More HCV Aware?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), baby boomers are 5 times more likely to have hepatitis C (HCV) than other adults. Through IV drug abuse and unprotected sex, baby boomers have reported such high HCV rates, Gavin Cloherty, PhD, director of Infectious Disease Research for Abbott’s diagnostics business told MD Magazine.

February, 14 2018
Channel Blockers Show Promise of New HCV Treatment
mdmag.comArticle
Channel Blockers Show Promise of New HCV Treatment

Recently-published research has reported exploitable weakness in virus replication that could result in new broad-spectrum antivirals. The antivirals have the potential to revolutionize how infectious diseases like HCV are treated.

February, 3 2018
Weak Evidence for Vitamin E as Tardive Dyskinesia Treatment
mdmag.comArticle
Weak Evidence for Vitamin E as Tardive Dyskinesia Treatment

A review of studies investigating the efficacy of vitamin E as a treatment for tardive dyskinesia (TD) has found weak evidence that it may improve the symptoms of TD. According to the lead study author, Hanna Bergman, PhD, the primary objective of this review was to determine if vitamin E provides a clinically significant improvement in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness, who developed TD from taking antipsychotic medications.

February, 13 2018
HIV Testing Not a Big Concern for Millennials
mdmag.comArticle
HIV Testing Not a Big Concern for Millennials
New Multi-Drug Resistant Infection Guidelines Released
mdmag.comArticle
New Multi-Drug Resistant Infection Guidelines Released

New expert guidance released January 11 by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) advises hospitals how to determine when they can most safely discontinue contact precautions (CP) for patients experiencing multi-drug resistant infections like Clostridium difficile (C. diff).

January, 25 2018
DAAs Make Possible Transplant of HCV Positive Organs
mdmag.comArticle
DAAs Make Possible Transplant of HCV Positive Organs

More than 100,000 Americans are on the organ donor list, and the vast majority need kidneys. Around 17,000 Americans actually receive a kidney transplant every year, while almost 5,000 die waiting. New research has reported that new DAA drugs may hold the key to making many more organs available to waiting patients.

February, 9 2018
Effectiveness of Fidaxomicin Versus Vancomycin for Clostridium Difficile Treatment
mdmag.comArticle
Effectiveness of Fidaxomicin Versus Vancomycin for Clostridium Difficile Treatment

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is presently one of the largest drug-resistant threats to our population according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the severity and incidence have risen significantly in recent years.

January, 5 2018
Researchers Look at CAR-T Treatments for HIV
healthline.comArticle
Researchers Look at CAR-T Treatments for HIV

In a new study, the treatment that has shown promise in fighting cancer also was effective in battling the virus that causes AIDS. A new treatment that has shown promise in defeating cancer might eventually also be effective in battling the virus that causes AIDS.

January, 10 2018
How can baby boomers become more HCV aware?
eatg.orgInterview
How can baby boomers become more HCV aware?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), baby boomers are 5 times more likely to have hepatitis C (HCV) than other adults. Through IV drug abuse and unprotected sex, baby boomers have reported such high HCV rates, Gavin Cloherty, PhD, director of Infectious Disease Research for Abbott’s diagnostics business told MD Magazine.

February, 14 2018
Latent Viral Reservoirs Create Hurdle to HIV Cure
specialtypharmacytimes.comArticle
Latent Viral Reservoirs Create Hurdle to HIV Cure

A new study conducted by George Washington University researchers found that latent HIV reservoirs are resistant to CD8+ T-cells, the white blood cells which eliminate infected cells. Current anti-HIV treatments are very effective at making HIV undetectable, allowing people living with the virus to live longer and healthier lives. These treatments use a class of medications to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART), which also dramatically reduces the possibility of person to person transmission.

January, 26 2018
Drinking Too Much Alcohol May Increase Dementia Risk
healthline.comArticle
Drinking Too Much Alcohol May Increase Dementia Risk

Researchers say drinking is the number one preventable risk for dementia. However, there’s conflicting research on how much alcohol is too much. Alcohol and dementia may have a stronger connection than previously thought. The majority of early onset dementia cases are associated with alcohol use disorders or are alcohol-related, according to research recently published in The Lancet Public Health.

March, 1 2018
Why Are Drug-Resistant HIV Strains Becoming More Prevalent?
healthline.comInterview
Why Are Drug-Resistant HIV Strains Becoming More Prevalent?
March, 22 2018
Brain Stimulation May Help Stutterers, Students, and Athletes
healthline.comArticle
Brain Stimulation May Help Stutterers, Students, and Athletes

Recent research indicates that sending a mild shock to the brain can help with speech problems and performance levels. However, experts say don’t try this at home. Sending a mild shock to the brain may help resolve speech problems. It may also offer an innovative way to improve learning and performance levels.

April, 5 2018
Menopause Treatment: New Therapy On The Way
healthline.comArticle
Menopause Treatment: New Therapy On The Way

Researchers say a new type of drug that blocks a receptor in the brain could provide relief for women going through menopause. There’s good news for women going through menopause, if you can wait three years or so.

April, 9 2018
What’s the Best Way to Talk to a Teen About Sexual Identity?
healthline.comArticle
What’s the Best Way to Talk to a Teen About Sexual Identity?
April, 19 2018
Zumba Tips for People With Bad Knees
livestrong.comArticle
Zumba Tips for People With Bad Knees
December, 5 2017
This Is Not a Drill... Researchers Using Proteins to Treat Cavities
healthline.comInterview
This Is Not a Drill... Researchers Using Proteins to Treat Cavities
April, 23 2018
New At-Home Treatment for IBS Focuses on Mind Over Body
healthline.comInterview
New At-Home Treatment for IBS Focuses on Mind Over Body
April, 26 2018
Could a Lung Cancer Drug Point to a Cure for HIV?
healthline.comArticle
Could a Lung Cancer Drug Point to a Cure for HIV?
March, 12 2018
Long-Term Use of Tylenol During Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Autism, ADHD
healthline.comArticle
Long-Term Use of Tylenol During Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Autism, ADHD

Researchers say pregnant women who use acetaminophen products for four weeks or more can increase their unborn child’s risk of autism and ADHD. Acetaminophen is one of the most common treatments used by pregnant women for pain and fever.

May, 7 2018
Simple Act of Walking Can Boost Chances of Certain Women to Get Pregnant
healthline.comArticle
Simple Act of Walking Can Boost Chances of Certain Women to Get Pregnant

Researchers say physical activity in general doesn’t help fertility, but they believe walking may help obese women in particular to become pregnant. Research indicates there is no relationship between most kinds of physical activity and the likelihood of a woman getting pregnant. However, for women who have experienced one or more miscarriages, researchers in a new study say walking may actually help.

May, 15 2018
There May Be No Permanent Cure for Atrial Fibrillation
healthline.comArticle
There May Be No Permanent Cure for Atrial Fibrillation

Researchers say even after irregular heartbeats are treated, they can return and the increased risk for stroke remains.

Dietary Salt--Not Just Hypertension--May Affect Brain
medscape.comInterview
Dietary Salt--Not Just Hypertension--May Affect Brain

High salt intake may have a dramatic impact on memory and cognitive functioning, independent of its effect on blood pressure, according to an animal study published in Nature Neuroscience.[1]

May, 10 2018
Depression Can Make Your Brain Age More Quickly
healthline.comArticle
Depression Can Make Your Brain Age More Quickly

Researchers say depression can increase your risk for dementia. Here’s why and some simple steps you can take to reduce the odds.

June, 6 2018
Newly Discovered Type of Heart Attack Primarily Affects Women
healthline.comArticle
Newly Discovered Type of Heart Attack Primarily Affects Women

Researchers say the heart attack known as MINOCA doesn’t involve obstructed arteries and is often dismissed as minor by medical professionals.

June, 8 2018
Millennials Not Receiving HIV Tests
specialtypharmacytimes.comArticle
Millennials Not Receiving HIV Tests

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that about 1.1 million individuals are living with HIV in the United States alone; about 166,000 are unaware of their status. One of the biggest challenges in the fight against the virus is that not enough individuals are getting tested in accordance with CDC recommendations.

February, 22 2018
How Much Caffeine Do You Need to Function? A New App May Help
healthline.comArticle
How Much Caffeine Do You Need to Function? A New App May Help

Researchers divide us into three types of “caffeine sensitivity.” Now, an app with a new algorithm may be able to calculate the perfect caffeine dose for everyone. Why do some people have laser focus after one cup of coffee while it seems others have to keep a pot brewing all day to just stay awake? According to a report by Dr. J.W. Langer, a science journalist, genetic factors determine our reaction to caffeine.

June, 14 2018
Teens Can Now Get HIV Drug… Will They Use It?
healthline.comArticle
Teens Can Now Get HIV Drug… Will They Use It?
May, 25 2018
Children exposed to drugs, violence experience higher incidence of HIV as adults
positivelite.comInterview
Children exposed to drugs, violence experience higher incidence of HIV as adults
January, 8 2018
Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Colorectal Cancer
healthline.comArticle
Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Colorectal Cancer

As if you needed another reason to catch some rays this summer, a new study has uncovered evidence that vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer.

June, 20 2018
Are Your Kid’s Headphones Permanently Damaging Their Hearing?
healthline.comArticle
Are Your Kid’s Headphones Permanently Damaging Their Hearing?
June, 27 2018
Excessive Iron in the Brain May Be a Factor in Alzheimer's Disease
healthline.comArticle
Excessive Iron in the Brain May Be a Factor in Alzheimer's Disease

Researchers say a type of iron called magnetite shows up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. Figuring out why could lead to new treatments for the disease.

July, 2 2018
Cost of HIV Prevention Drug Discouraging People from Doing PrEP Therapy
healthline.comArticle
Cost of HIV Prevention Drug Discouraging People from Doing PrEP Therapy

Truvada costs $2,000 a month. Experts say that out-of-pocket expense is preventing a lot of people from taking the PrEP treatment to prevent HIV infection. A drug doesn’t do much good if people don’t take it. That has apparently become the situation with Truvada, the highly effective medication used in the PrEP treatment that helps people avoid contracting HIV.

July, 11 2018
The Link Between Asthma and Atrial Fibrillation
healthline.comArticle
The Link Between Asthma and Atrial Fibrillation

Researchers say asthma that is poorly controlled can increase a person’s risk of developing AFib, although the reasons why aren’t entirely clear.

July, 16 2018
Police Killings of Unarmed Victims Tied to Poor Mental Health in Blacks
medscape.comArticle
Police Killings of Unarmed Victims Tied to Poor Mental Health in Blacks

Black individuals in the United States are three times more likely than whites to be killed by police, but new research suggests it is the killing of unarmed blacks that adversely affects the mental health of this population.

July, 17 2018
High Blood Pressure May Be Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease
healthline.comArticle
High Blood Pressure May Be Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers say hypertension in older adults can cause tangles and plaques to form in the brain. Both are common markers of Alzheimer’s disease. It’s well-documented that high blood pressure increases the risk of heart disease. Now, new research suggests that hypertension can also seriously affect your brain — perhaps to the point of developing some of the primary markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

July, 23 2018
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